Nottingham Greyhound Stadium Guide

Nottingham Greyhound Stadium is, as the name suggests, in a suburb of the city of Nottingham. It’s about ten minutes drive from the city’s train station – the de facto centre of town considering its such a spread out location. Nottingham had had a greyhound stadium since 1927 when White City Stadium opened, but its closure in 1970 meant that there was nowhere for punters to go and watch the dogs. Colwick Park greyhound track opened in 1980 to fill the vacant hole.

It is a decent place to spend some time, as evidenced by the fact that the British Greyhound Racing Board voted it the Central Region Racecourse of the Year in both 1999 and 2002. Billing itself as ‘the home of greyhound racing in the North-East, Nottingham Greyhound Stadium promises great entertainment at prices that don’t break the bank. With a restaurant, three bars and a place to buy snacks, you can see why they feel comfortable making that promise.

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Race Days & Times

As is the case with most greyhound stadiums nowadays, Nottingham Stadium offers a number of normal meetings, as well as a Bookmakers Afternoon Greyhound Service. The standard races are on Mondays, Fridays and Saturdays with the BAGS meeting taking place on Tuesdays.

If you want to see some dog racing on a Monday, then the first race starts at 6.28pm, doors open at 6pm and the last race is at 10pm. The doors open at 6pm on a Friday and a Saturday too, with the first Friday race starting at 6.28pm and the first Saturday one is at 7.22pm. Friday’s last race is 10.15pm and Saturdays is 10.37pm. Doors open for the BAGS racing at 10am, first race is 11.03am and the last one is 1.51pm.

Visiting

  • Ticket Prices: The BAGS racing isn’t aimed at attracting a big crowd, but it's the perfect time to check out the stadium as entry is free. Monday racing costs £5 and it’s £6 on a Friday and Saturday. It’s free entrance for under-eighteen-year-olds.
  • Getting There: Nottingham Train Station is two miles from the stadium, so you might want to get a bus or taxi from there. If it’s the former, then you’ll need to keep an eye out for bus numbers 44 and Citylink 2. If you’re driving then you’ll be looking for the A612, which runs right past the stadium.
  • Parking: Cars, coaches and minibuses can all park in the large car park in front of the stadium. You’re not allowed to leave your car there overnight, though, so bear that in mind if you’re thinking of having a drink.

History

A horse racing course had existed in Nottingham since 1892. When White City Stadium closed in 1970 the members of the Severn and Trent greyhound clubs kept themselves close to Nottingham city council and gradually persuaded them to open a new greyhound track as part of the horse-racing course in the city. Colwick Park, as it was known back then, opened on the 24th of January 1980 on a space where a car park used to be.

There were over 2000 people at the course’s inaugural meeting, seeing dogs run around a 442-metre track on Worksop Grey sand. There were six 500-metre races and two that took place over about 295-metres. The first ever winner on the track was a W Horton trained dog named Tartan Al, which came home at odds of 7/1.

When the stadium initially opened it did so after an investment of about £250,000 and included the Panorama Room, a state-of-the-art restaurant and even a totaliser. The track was larger than others and so it was an attractive course to trainers that wanted to push their dogs and see what they could get from them. Scurlogue Champ, for example, turned up in 1985 and actually broke the course record. Ballyregan Bob was a record breaking dog, winning 32 consecutive races. Two of those races came at the Nottingham track in October 1985 and April of 1986.

The stadium has hosted some big competitions over the years and is the home of the Select Stakes, a race that took place at Wembley Stadium between 1952 and 1996 before it switched to Nottingham. In 1990 The Stadium Bookmakers National Sprint was moved there after previously having been based at Harringay Stadium until its closure in 1987.

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